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Correction: Santa Clarita's Reaction To StudentsFirst Report Card On Education

Correction: The article orginally stated some misinformation about StudentsFirst and the organizations head, Michelle Rhee. 

California is one of 11 states to recently receive an overall grade of F in a StudentsFirst report card evaluating education.

The StudentsFirst report repeatedly emphasized using students test scores to evaluate teachers and decide how much funding schools would receive, but did not consider student test scores in the report. Instead the report focused on how states evaluate teachers, empower parents and allocate funding.

Each grade included a slew of suggestions regarding funding, how teachers are evaluated and increasing the number of charter schools.


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While Gloria Mercado-Fortine, William S Hart School Board member agreed with some suggestions, she strongly disagreed that California should allow mayoral control of money for education as a way to decrease red tape surrounding the allocation of state funding.

“Leave education in the hands of educators,” Mercado-Fortine said. “For example, the mayor of LA took over several schools in unified school district  and if you look at data, he put a lot of money into it but they are doing poorly.”

Mercado-Fortine said the Hart District already evaluates teachers and administrators a minimum of every other year, and “shame on” school districts that don’t.  

She added that during layoffs the districts decisions are based on seniority, but may consider evaluations in the future depending on the results of a lawsuit brought against the Los Angeles School District regarding teachers being laid off based on seniority.  

Mercado-Fortine also thought increasing the number of people that can approve charter schools could be a positive change.

“I’d be careful on who, but I can see educational entities beyond school districts, lets say colleges or universities doing that,” Mercado-Fortine said.  “These are professionals, I cannot see mayors or politicians doing that.”

But Mercado-Fortine suggested that people research StudentsFirst before taking everything it says for face value.

Article Name: Next Generation Science Standard Will Affect Santa Clarita Valley Schools 
Article Source: Santa Clarita News
Author: Ashley Soley-Cerro, Twitter